Last edited by Mikagal
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

3 edition of A study of humanistic teaching strategies and nursing students" attitudes about death and dying found in the catalog.

A study of humanistic teaching strategies and nursing students" attitudes about death and dying

Robert Eugene Leftwich

A study of humanistic teaching strategies and nursing students" attitudes about death and dying

by Robert Eugene Leftwich

  • 304 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Robert Eugene Leftwich.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofilm 81127
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationvi, 102 leaves.
Number of Pages102
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3067673M
LC Control Number82165077

Care is conceptualized as values and as attitudes" (Symanski, , p. ). Nursing leaders have examined caring as a value, which must be taught in the classroom and clinical setting. They see this instruction as essential to promote caring professional behavior in the next generation of nurses (Symanski, ). In a series of interviews with both students and faculty within small. Discusses the need for appropriate emotions in professional nursing practice within an explanation for humanistic education, presenting Kohlberg's moral development theory. Explains a case study method that helps in achieving moral, emotional development. (JOW)Cited by: 2.

Beyond simply covering content, thought-provoking strategies are essential when teaching about EOL issues so students can recognize their “own attitudes, feelings, values and Cited by: The aim of this study was to evaluate attitudes toward life and death among nursing students after attending the life and death studies (LDS) program. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to collect data. The pretest-posttest control group design randomly assigned students to an experimental (n = 47) or control group (n = 49).Cited by: 8.

The purpose of this MSN thesis is to determine “An Assessment of Nurses’ Knowledge and Attitudes toward End of Life Care Pain Management”. The research data and analysis showed what the perceptions are regarding pain management at the end of life care. The research study consisted of nurses being surveyed on their attitudes and. Effectiveness of a death-education program in reducing death anxiety of nursing students: Omega: Journal of Death and Dying Vol 22(1) , Johnson, E. L. (). Attitudes toward death and dying among student nurses as affected by a specialized curriculum: Dissertation Abstracts International.


Share this book
You might also like
Patterns of government revenue and expenditure in developing countries and their relevance to policy

Patterns of government revenue and expenditure in developing countries and their relevance to policy

Life and letters of John Arthur Roebuck ...

Life and letters of John Arthur Roebuck ...

Tales of wonder

Tales of wonder

Problems and projects for engineering graphics

Problems and projects for engineering graphics

Propaganda in the helping professions

Propaganda in the helping professions

What next, baby bear!

What next, baby bear!

Resolution of inquiry with respect to United States military involvement in hostilities in Central America

Resolution of inquiry with respect to United States military involvement in hostilities in Central America

The chapel of St. Anthony at the Santo and the development of Venetian Renaissance sculpture

The chapel of St. Anthony at the Santo and the development of Venetian Renaissance sculpture

Prince Deukalion

Prince Deukalion

Revision of the modified mouthparts species group of Hawaiian Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

Revision of the modified mouthparts species group of Hawaiian Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

Crusades

Crusades

Treaty between the United States of America and Miami tribe of Indians.

Treaty between the United States of America and Miami tribe of Indians.

long holiday

long holiday

A study of humanistic teaching strategies and nursing students" attitudes about death and dying by Robert Eugene Leftwich Download PDF EPUB FB2

In one study in this regards, Iranmanesh et al., conducted a study among nursing students in Bam and Kerman to measure their attitudes toward death and caring for dying patients.

Similar to our findings, they reported that Iranian nursing students did not have positive attitudes toward caring for dying patients.

The aims of this study were to analyze the relationships between death attitudes and perceived emotional intelligence in a sample of nursing students, and to determine whether there are. Studies on death-related education for nursing students have focused mainly on the possibility of altering attitudes toward death [17,18].

However, teaching death and dying is not sufficient for nursing students, who are expected to care for the spirituality of all clients, including the by: 8. Students enrolled in a week online death and dying course were compared with students in a control group on baseline and follow-up Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care.

Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the nursing students′ attitude toward caring for dying patients and effects of education on their attitude. Materials and Methods: The present study enjoys a quasi-experimental method with using one-group pre-test/post-test design conducted in Bam in southeast of by: Nursing education needs to prepare students for care of dying patients.

The aim of this study was to describe the development of nursing students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their perceived preparedness to perform end-of-life care. A longitudinal study was performed with nursing students at six universities in by: Nurses face their own fear of death whenever they come to the bedside of a dying patient This fear must be confronted and reconciled before they can help others meet death with dignity Examining one's attitude towards death is a difficult task that needs to begin in the student years, when attitudes towards working with the dying are formed Nurse educators recognize that brief Cited by: Nursing Students’ Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying Impending death affects patients and their families physically, emotionally, and spiritually, requiring nurses to provide holistic end-of-life (EOL) care that includes more than knowledge of facts and physical tasks.

Virginia Henderson () described nursing as ‘holistic’Author: Betsy N. Ward, Elizabeth Nora Ward. The humanistic classroom provides a holistic approach to learning by keeping the focus on the child.

The student is respected as an individual and is. Nurses rated the lack of nursing education in EOL care as an obstacle, but many may not realize the full benefits of an in-depth course in EOL care. A current study identified 87% of nurses stated that they care for dying patients in their current role; 28% said they never cared for a dying patient during nursing school.

Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. A study of humanistic teaching strategies and nursing students' attitudes about death and dying by Robert Eugene Leftwich, edition, Microform in EnglishPages: Death is an inevitable phenomenon that affects every human being.

Nurses are present at both the beginning and the end of life, and play a key role in caring for dying patients. That role is seen as one of the most stressful facets of nursing (Hopkinson, Hallett, and Luker, ). has engaging psychology courses in general psychology, social psychology, abnormal psychology, human growth and development, and more.

Our. In this study, the lived experiences of nursing students showed that the main theme of “humanistic approach to nursing education” was emerged of two sub-themes including the “ethical necessities” and “effective interaction”. Ethical Necessities. It is determined that most of the nursing students crying reaction and apply praying method in order to cope with the sorrow.

Conclusion: This study indicates that more than half of the students encoenter death at any term of their lifes, this situation increases death anxiety and students with high death anxiety don’t want to care for a.

Abstract. This study compared the difference in attitudes towards death and dying between 17 Asian and 11 American graduate nursing students.

Asian and American students did not significantly differ in attitudes related to fear of death, of self, or others, but Asian students were significantly more afraid than American students of their own process of dying.

spend more time with dying patients (Thacker, ). Caring for the dying patient might evoke attitudes and emotions in nurses such as stress, anxiety, sadness, and fear. Nurses’ attitudes toward death and dying could affect the nursing care they provide.

Inthe International Council of Nurses mandated that nurses have a primaryFile Size: KB. Background: Education about caring for dying patients could be effective in changing nursing students' attitude toward caring for dying patients.

Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the nursing students' attitude toward caring for dying patients and effects of education on their attitude. Materials and Methods: The present study enjoys a quasi-experimental method. Humanistic Learning Theory in the Classroom - Chapter Summary.

There are many ways to approach instruction using practical approaches. This. Teaching loss, grief, and bereavement to nursing students should be an interactive process to stimulate critical thinking and address the affective domain of learning. Lecture as a teaching methodology may be the easiest to prepare and deliver; however, used alone, it is ineffective in identifying perceptions, fears, and issues related to dying.

Abstract Most nursing students fear death or care of the dying and thus question their abilities to give compassionate and competent care to patients or families at end-of-life (EOL). Research has shown positive results when students have experiences with dying patients in environments where interdisciplinary palliative and end-of-life practices are : Betsy N.

Ward, Elizabeth Nora Ward. Professional Values Clarifying Nurse’s Values Acquired during experience from code of ethics, nursing, teachers, and peers. 5 VALUES ESSENTIAL FOR PROFESSIONAL NURSE: ALTRUISM AUTONOMY HUMAN DIGNITY INTEGRITY SOCIAL JUSTICE Nurses and nursing students need to examine the values they hold about life, death, health and illness.The humanistic perspective focuses on the positive image of what it means to be human.

Human nature is viewed as basically good, and humanistic theorists focus on methods that allow fulfillment of potential. Abraham Maslow proposed that an individual is motivated by a hierarchy of needs. Basic needs must be met before higher ones can be.